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In the News: April 2015 Archives



Natural Health News

Exercise improves non-alcoholic fatty liver disease



NAFLD is considered the hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome and is commonly associated with obesity and diabetes. There are no approved drug treatments for NAFLD, but lifestyle interventions such as diet, exercise, and the resulting weight loss have been shown to help improve NAFLD. In particular, these interventions can improve some features of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), which is the progressive form of NAFLD.Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common cause of chronic liver...

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Natural Health News

New piece in the 'French paradox' diet and health puzzle: Cheese metabolism



New piece in the 'French paradox' diet and health puzzle: Cheese metabolism Figuring out why the French have low cardiovascular disease rates despite a diet high in saturated fats has spurred research and many theories to account for this phenomenon known as the "French paradox." Most explanations focus on wine and lifestyle, but a key role could belong to another French staple: cheese. The evidence, say scientists in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry,...

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Natural Health News

Pesticide exposure contributes to heightened risk of heart disease



Pesticide exposure contributes to heightened risk of heart disease Pesticide exposure, not obesity alone, can contribute to increased cardiovascular disease risk and inflammation in premenopausal women, according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.The study looked at the effects of exposure to polychlorinated pesticides such as DDT. Although DDT was banned in many countries in the 1970s, it remains widespread in the environment and food supply. DDT...

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Natural Health News

Microbes help produce serotonin in gut



Microbes help produce serotonin in gut Although serotonin is well known as a brain neurotransmitter, it is estimated that 90 percent of the body's serotonin is made in the digestive tract. In fact, altered levels of this peripheral serotonin have been linked to diseases such as irritable bowel syndrome, cardiovascular disease, and osteoporosis. New research at Caltech, published in the April 9 issue of the journal Cell, shows that certain bacteria in the gut are...

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Natural Health News

Common antidepressant increased coronary atherosclerosis in animal model



Common antidepressant increased coronary atherosclerosis in animal model A commonly prescribed antidepressant caused up to a six-fold increase in atherosclerosis plaque in the coronary arteries of non-human primates, according to a study by researchers at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center. Coronary artery atherosclerosis is the primary cause of heart attacks The study is published in the current online issue of the journal Psychosomatic Medicine. "The medical community has known for years that depression is closely...

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