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Summer 2018


Summer Detox Program with Dr. KaneSunscreen GuideSpring

 

 

  


 

Connecticut Center For Health

Newsletter

May 22, 2018

 

  

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Dear MICHAEL!

 

This summer season will have some challenges. It promises to be a very bad season for ticks.  We have seen many cases of Lyme Disease, but ticks also carry a number of other potential infectious agents. The article below provides some helpful information.

The sun and its effects on the skin is also addressed in this summer focused issue.

Also we are hosting a Summer Detox program specifically with teachers in mind.  Many times when we run these programs the timing is just not something busy teachers can fit in. By offering this over the summer, we hope to make it more accessible for all you teachers.

Case study- Adult onset Type 1 Diabetes, a condition that is on the rise.

 


 

 

 

This article on Ticks and prevention is timely.

One thing I avoid is using Deet on my skin.  I will spray my shoes and clothes but do not put on my skin.  I do spray my skin with a natural bug spray that contains lemon eucalyptus.

Dr. Michael Kane

 

 

How to remove a tick and prevent future bites

Source:

American Academy of Dermatology

Summary:

As tick populations grow and spread across the country, their prevalence is increasing the public's risk for some troubling diseases. Of these diseases, say dermatologists, Lyme disease, Rocky Mountain spotted fever, Powassan virus and alpha-gal syndrome --- a mysterious red meat allergy --- are among the most serious.

 

As tick populations grow and spread across the country, their prevalence is increasing the public's risk for some troubling diseases. Of these diseases, say dermatologists from the American Academy of Dermatology, Lyme disease, Rocky Mountain spotted fever, Powassan virus and alpha-gal syndrome -- a mysterious red meat allergy -- are among the most serious.

 

"Although most ticks do not carry disease, it's important to be mindful of these risks and keep an eye out while you're outdoors," said board-certified dermatologist Lindsay Strowd, MD, FAAD, an assistant professor of dermatology at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. "If you notice a tick crawling on you or attached to your skin, remove it immediately to prevent any potential infection."

To remove a tick that is attached to your skin, Dr. Strowd recommends the following tips:

  1. Use tweezers to remove the tick. Sterilize the tip of the tweezers using rubbing alcohol and grasp the tick as close to the skin's surface as possible.
  2. Pull upward with steady, even pressure. Avoid twisting, squeezing or crushing the tick, as this can cause its head or mouth to break off and remain in your skin. If this happens, use tweezers to remove the remaining parts. If you cannot remove the rest of the tick, see a board-certified dermatologist.
  3. Dispose of the tick. Place it in a sealed bag or container; submerse the tick in alcohol; or wrap it tightly in tape. You may also want to save the tick in a sealed jar. That way, if you develop any symptoms after the bite, the tick can be tested for disease.
  4. Clean the bite area with soap and water.

"Although ticks can bite at any time, they're most active in April through September," said Dr. Strowd. "Fortunately, there are many things people can do to protect themselves and their families against ticks."

 

To prevent tick bites, Dr. Strowd recommends the following tips:

  1. Walk in the center of trails. Avoid walking through heavily wooded and brushy areas with tall grass.
  2. If you must walk through heavily wooded areas, wear long pants and long sleeves. Pull your socks up over your pants, and tuck your shirt into your pants to prevent ticks from crawling up your body. It's also a good idea to wear light-colored clothes so that ticks can be spotted easily.
  3. Use insect repellent that contains 20 to 30 percent DEET on exposed skin and clothing. Make sure to follow the product instructions. Parents should apply this product to their children, making sure to avoid the hands, eyes and mouth.
  4. Examine your skin after spending time in heavily wooded or brushy areas. Conduct a full-body tick check to make sure that no ticks are crawling on you. Since ticks prefer warm, moist areas, be sure to check your armpits, groin and hair. You should also check your children and pets, as well as any gear you used outside.

"If you develop any symptoms within a few weeks after a tick bite, such as a rash, fever or body aches, see a board-certified dermatologist," said Dr. Strowd. "Make sure you tell the doctor about your recent tick bite, when the bite occurred and where you most likely acquired the tick."

 


Sun Protection

by

Dr. Michael Kane

 

Find or make shade.  For those beach goers, bringing an umbrella is a great idea. For other areas outside find a shady so the direct rays of the sun are filtered.  

 

Avoid the most direct UV rays. 

Avoid the high UV sun exposure times 10-2 pm. These rays are the most intense as they are more likely to penetrate the atmosphere because the sun's more directly overhead in the summer.  

 

Wear sunglasses

Wearing sunglasses to protect the eyes is a must as well. The sun can do significant damage to the eyes.  Also wearing a hat with a wide brim keeps some of those direct rays from the eyes.

 

Wear Protective Clothing-  Clothing with a high Ultraviolet Protection Factor can reduce the suns ability to reach your skin. Look for clothing that has a UPF rating.

 

What Is UPF?

UPF stands for Ultraviolet Protection Factor. It indicates what fraction of the sun's ultraviolet rays can penetrate the fabric. A shirt with a UPF of 50, for example, allows just 1/50th of the sun's UV radiation to reach the skin.

 

Protection from the outside-  Sunscreen should be a last resort. Slathering your entire body with a lotion that has some questionable ingredients is not a great idea.  Often you will need to reapply frequently, making it even more important that the sunscreen is as non-toxic as possible.  Look at the link for suggestions from The Environmental Working Group website.  EWG Sunscreen Guide, it provides a rating for effectiveness and toxicity.

Protection from the inside.

There are supplements that have been shown to help protect cells from the harmful effects of the sun. We know that bioflavonoids are protective.  One in particular provides some powerful sun protection.

 

Astaxanthin- is a carotenoid that is naturally synthesized by a number of algae and yeasts.  It is available in our diet through the ingestion of wild caught salmon, shrimp and crayfish it is that pigment that makes that pink color in these food sources.

It is available as a supplement, typically derived from algae. It is closely related to other bioflavionids (zeaxanthin, lutein and B-carotene) but is more bioactive.

Health benefits of astaxanthin show that it has a number of properties that have skin benefit including photo protective, antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects,

Not all supplements are equal- some quality control tests have shown great variation in quality and purity.  So be careful in your selection.  We use a product by Designs for Health.  It contains 6 mg and the recommended dose is one capsule 1-2 times daily with food.

As always we advocate prevention, and provide you with information to make smart choices.

 


 

 

 Adult Onset Type 1 Diabetes

by

Dr. Michael Kane

 

 

Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune condition that is typically seen early in life but it is possible to develop as an adult. The immune system begins to attack the cells in the pancreas that produce insulin .  Insulin is that hormone that helps the body control blood sugar.  This attack can eventually destroy those cells so they can no longer produce insulin.  These people would then need to be on insulin for the rest of their lives.   In the 30-50 year age group, type 1 diabetes accounts for 13% of all new cases of diabetes.

 

I recently had a patient recently diagnosed with type 2 diabetes through his PCP and he was put on metformin to control his blood sugar.  While I was taking his medical history, he did present with a typical pattern for type 2 diabetes with a gradual increase in issues with blood sugar control.  

I ran some blood tests looking for markers for the control of blood sugar, and for the immune system markers that would be run to see if the immune system is attacking the pancreas.  As it turns out, those levels where very high, indicating this was indeed a Type 1 onset.  While this might not be a big factor for the control of his blood sugar from the MD's perspective, it makes a big deal from the naturopathic perspective because the cause of the diabetes is completely different. This was an autoimmune condition.

The question with any autoimmune condition is what causes the immune system to attack self.  There are some cases where there is a cross reactivity to foods. If the body, is creating antibodies (an attack) to certain foods and those foods have any structural proteins that match the proteins in the body those systems can be attacked as well.  It is thought that this cross reactivity could happen with virus or bacterial exposure as well.

In this persons case, there were multiple foods sensitivities detected.  He has cut out those foods and instituted a regular exercise and nutritional program to support his overall health.

So far we have seen a dramatic improvement in this bodies ability to regulate his blood sugar.  His most recent blood sugar reading was normal and he was noticing improvement in his overall health and wellbeing.

My hope is that we can decrease or eliminate the attack on the pancreas and preserve the healthy insulin producing cells.

 

 


 

Upcoming Events 

(Click on Link for More Information)

  

 

Summer Detox Program with Dr. Kane 

 

 

  


 

Keep us in mind for referrals.

We can help family members, friends, and co-workers feel better, reduce a disease, avoid or use fewer drugs and improve their quality of life. Your referral is our best advertisement.  With each referral you will receive a $20 coupon that you can put toward the purchase of supplements.  We are honored when you refer us to others as a trusted source of medical care. 

 

Thank you!


 

 


 

 

 

 


Upcoming Events 

(Click on Link for More Information)

 

 

 

 

 

  


 

Keep us in mind for referrals.

We can help family members, friends, and co-workers feel better, reduce a disease, avoid or use fewer drugs and improve their quality of life. Your referral is our best advertisement.  With each referral you will receive a $20 coupon that you can put toward the purchase of supplements.  We are honored when you refer us to others as a trusted source of medical care. 

 

Thank you!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Connecticut Center for Health:

 87 Bernie O'Rourke Dr  -

 Middletown, Connecticut 06457


ph: 860-347-8600

 

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