Home

Clinic Services
Dietary Supplements
Health Concerns
Natural Treatments

Blog & Newsletters
Resources Directory

Online Forms

Email to a Friend

Bookmark this Site

Index to Our Site

CCH Health Review

This free newsletter gives you original and immediately usable information from doctors to help you build your health and vitality!
Email:
Your e-mail address is totally secure. We will never misuse or sell your information.
Clinic Services | Online Store | Health Concerns | Newsletter Archives | Contact Us








Activity/exercise
Case Study- Testimonial
Health Concerns
In the News
Newsletter Archives
Nutrition
Supplements/Vitamins/Botanicals



Pregnant Women in US Test Positive for Multiple Chemicals


99% of Pregnant Women in US Test Positive for Multiple Chemicals Including Banned Ones, Study Suggests

ScienceDaily (Jan. 14, 2011) -- The bodies of virtually all U.S. pregnant women carry multiple chemicals, including some banned since the 1970s and others used in common products such as non-stick cookware, processed foods and personal care products, according to a new study from UCSF. The study marks the first time that the number of chemicals to which pregnant women are exposed has been counted.

in pregnant women without fully knowing the implications for pregnancy," said lead author Tracey Woodruff, PhD, MPH, director of the UCSF Program on Reproductive Health and the Environment.

"Several of these chemicals in pregnant women were at the same concentrations that have been associated with negative effects in children from other studies. In addition, exposure to multiple chemicals that can increase the risk of the same adverse health outcome can have a greater impact than exposure to just one chemical," said Woodruff, an associate professor in the UCSF Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences.

Exposure to chemicals during fetal development has been shown to increase the risk of adverse health consequences, including preterm birth and birth defects, childhood morbidity, and adult disease and mortality according to the research team. In addition, chemicals can cross the placenta and enter the fetus, and in other studies, a number of chemicals measured in maternal urine and serum have been found in amniotic fluid, cord blood and meconium, they state.

The researchers analyzed data for 268 pregnant women from the National Health and Nutritional Examination Survey (NHANES) 2003-2004, a nationally representative sample of the U.S. population.

"Our findings indicate several courses of action. First, additional research is needed to identify dominant sources of exposure to chemicals and how they influence our health, especially in reproduction," said Woodruff. "Second, while individuals can take actions in their everyday lives to protect themselves from toxins, significant, long-lasting change only will result from a systemic approach that includes proactive government policies."

Co-authors of the study are Ami R. Zota and Jackie M. Schwartz of the Program on Reproductive Health and the Environment, UCSF Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences.

Funding for the study was provided by the Pew Charitable Trusts and a grant from the Passport Science Innovation Fund.