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Strontium Citrate-


Strontium Citrate-
By Dr. Michael Kane

 Strontium  is a naturally occurring mineral that has been studied for its role in bone support.  It was first studied in the 1940's and 1950's as a nontoxic treatment for osteoporosis and demonstrated significant improvement without side effects.
 
The interesting thing is that strontium can support the bone structure in a number of ways,  It has been shown to decrease the process of bone breakdown but also stimulates the cells that are responsible for forming bone.
 
Strontium citrate is another form of strontium ranelate, a proven medication prescribed across Europe and Australia to treat and prevent osteoporosis and related fractures. Unlike pharmaceuticals, strontium citrate is not a prescribed medication and is inexpensive.

 
Ongoing research study at UC Davis,  "A Study to Prevent Osteoporosis with Dietary Supplement Strontium Citrate" will be completed in one year.  But many people with concerns for bone health and at risk for osteoporosis are not waiting for the results of this study.  Taking into account the studies of strontium ranelate and the non-toxic nature of the strontium citrate form, we have been prescribing it to our patients.
 
Please note the case study below....often as in this case we test vitamin
d levels and check to make sure that the dietary and supplemental sources of calcium are adequate.
 
If interested in finding out more - talk with your doctor at your next office visit.